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Extras

Here are the answers for last week's 'Extras':

 

The Bletchley Park Morse code message was:

WE HEREBY SURRENDER. ALL UNITS TO CEASE ACTIVE OPERATIONS AT 2301 ON 8 MAY 1945.

 

The anagrams were:

  1. Winston Churchill
  2. Victory in Europe
  3. Rationing
  4. Bletchley Park
  5. Surrender
  6. Morse Code

 

Here are this week's 'Extras':

Observed annually on May 12th, National Limerick Day celebrates the birthday of English artist, illustrator, author and poet Edward Lear (May 12th, 1812 – January 29th, 1888). 

He is known mostly for his literary nonsense in poetry, prose and limericks.

National Limerick Day also celebrates the limerick poem. Limerick poems were popularised by Edward Lear’s book “Book of Nonsense” in 1846.

A limerick is a very short, humorous, nonsense poem.

Within a limerick, there are five lines. The first two lines rhyme with the fifth line and the third and fourth line rhyme together.

 

Here are some examples. The first is by Edward Lear.

 

There was a Young Lady whose chin
Resembled the point of a pin;
So she had it made sharp,

and purchased a harp,
And played several tunes with her chin.

 

 

There once was a child in Spain,
Who loved to play in the rain.
One day he tripped,
And broke his hip,
Now he is in serious pain.

 

 

A circus performer named Brian,
Once smiled as he rode on a lion.
They came back from the ride,
But with Brian inside,
And the smile on the face of the lion.

 

 

I'm really determined and keen,
To start giving this house a spring clean.
I will do it I say,
Yes, I'll do it today,
Well, I'll do it tomorrow, I mean.

 

 

Perhaps you'd like to have a go at writing your own limerick!

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